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Author: Elections Wales

More about Foreigners…

This post follows up last week’s one on attitudes to minority groups. As I discussed there, one thing we found in this year’s Welsh Election Study was evidence of significant negative sentiment in Wales to some minority groups, in particular refugees and migrants from eastern Europe. When planning the content of the 2016 Welsh Election Study surveys, we couldn’t then know what our questions about attitudes to minority groups would find. We did, though, already know from lots of other evidence that there was considerable public concern in Wales about immigration, and that it was likely to be a significant issue in the Welsh Assembly election – despite the Assembly having no competence over such matters. There were various ways in which we could, and did, seek to explore the issue of migration. One of them, which occurred to us while planning the surveys, was to explore the question of who is considered to be an immigrant. We know that the official net migration statistics include some people who many might not categorise as ‘immigrants’ (such as UK citizens returning to live in the UK after some time abroad); they might also not include some who various people might think of as immigrants. We thought this area might be interesting to have a look at. So we asked the following question in our pre-election survey: “People often talk about...

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A Bit More on Prejudice in Wales

One of my most widely-read blog posts in the last year was this one, which used data from the 2011 Welsh Election Study surveys to explore attitudes, and levels of prejudice, towards various groups in society. The analysis was based around answers to a question which asked survey respondents “[U]sing a scale from 0 to 10, where 0 means very unfavourable and 10 means very favourable, how do you feel about…”. This question was repeated in this year’s Welsh Election Study pre-election wave survey (which was run in March, before the formal campaign period for the election began). This time, we asked the question about the following groups: – Gay and lesbian people – Muslim people – Black people – White people – Transgender people – Jewish people – People who speak Welsh – People from England who come to live in Wales – People from Eastern Europe who come to live in Wales – People who come to live in Wales as refugees from conflict zones like Syria (Those items listed above in italics were repeated from the survey in 2011; those not in italics were added in 2016 as new groups about which to explore attitudes). So what did we find? First, I’ll give four sets of figures for the overall sample: The percentage of WES respondents giving 0 out of 10 for that group (in short, those...

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And a Bit More on Wales and Brexit…

One last set of results from the most recent Welsh Political Barometer poll. These were some additional questions – paid for by Cardiff University, and held back from publication until an event organised by the university at Westminster this morning. These questions probed some other aspects of public attitudes towards Brexit, and its implications for Wales. As with my previous blog post, what I’ll do here is run through the question wordings and the responses received. In presenting the findings, I’ll give three sets of figures – the results across the overall sample, plus those for respondents who voted Remain and those who voted Leave in the June EU referendum. The first question we asked concerned the type of post-Brexit deal that the UK should seek with the EU: “Thinking about Britain’s future relationship with the European Union now it has voted to leave, which of the following would you most like to see?” The following options were then presented to survey respondents: Britain should leave the EU completely and have no sort of formal deal with the rest of the EU Britain should try to make only a limited deal with the rest of the EU, restricting any deal only to trade Britain should try to make a wider deal with the rest of the EU, giving Britain full trade access to the rest of the EU, in...

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