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With the news that the long-running Caerphilly council pay scandal, involving three of it’s most senior officers, including its chief executive, is set to rise to £3.6m, today’s editorial in the Western Mail questions the system which has allowed this to happen, it’s worth a read.

I have mentioned the situation in Caerphilly numerous times on this blog, and made parallels with Carmarthenshire, most recently here, and both situations arose following ‘unlawful’ findings by the Wales Audit Office.

The difference in Carmarthenshire, where there was a secret pay rise via an unlawful pension ‘arrangement’ and the unlawful libel indemnity, was that the council leadership were (and still are) so firmly in the pocket of the chief executive that they refused to suspend him, it was only when the pressure from outside the council began to mount that he eventually, and ‘voluntarily’, ‘stepped-aside’ whilst the police gave it all a cursory glance. On that point I find it incredible that the police spent a mere three months chewing over some paperwork (and did not correspond with either County Hall or the CPS) yet found a spare 18 months to investigate, question and eventually charge me, all of which was entirely fruitless.

Anyway, in some ways we are fortunate that no ‘official’ action has been taken against Mr James as the taxpayers of Carmarthenshire would be footing a similar bill.
At the end of the day it is cheaper, and easier all round, to allow him to get away scot free with the audit office findings, and the substantial associated costs of the scandals; allow him free use of council resources for his private interests; take no action over decisions which deliberately disadvantage the taxpayer; ignore the fact he has undeclared business interests; allow him to pervert the constitution to appoint his loyal disciples; allow him to economise with the truth, threaten the press, mislead and threaten councillors, interfere with and block democratic debate, etc etc.

As has been shown, with the farce in Caerphilly, getting shot of senior officers is such an extraordinarily tortuous and expensive process, it’s virtually impossible. The protection afforded to senior officials is more or less total and way above the usual employment protection rules, and as the editorial says ‘Our councils are simply unable to manage senior staff when things go wrong’.

It’s also a matter of semantics. What is politely termed ‘unlawful’ in world of senior council officialdom, is quite simply illegal, fraudulent or downright immoral to the rest of us.

The editorial concludes by speculating on whether Mr O’Sullivan will be given a pay out and if so, it would, in general terms be a shameful day for the politicians in Cardiff Bay and Westminster who have been unable to deal with the problems that undoubtedly exist in the most senior ranks of local authorities across the UK.”

The “problem” certainly exists in the senior ranks of Carmarthenshire. It’s time for the system to change and County Hall Carmarthen would be a good place to start.